Video Blog: Start-Up Trade Secrets

TRANSCRIPT & LINKS:

Welcome to Protecting Trade Secrets. I’m Eric Ostroff. I’m a partner at Meland Russin & Budwick and I’m coming to you from my office in Miami Florida. I’m doing something new here on the Protecting Trade Secrets blog. Obviously, I’m on video right now, and I’ll be using video to create blog posts for at least some of the blog posts in the future. I’ll also go ahead and post a transcript of the video down below.

Today I want to talk about issues facing start-up companies who are looking to protect their proprietary information and trade secrets. I recently read an article on inc.com and I’ll go ahead and post a link to the article in the transcript below.

This article told the story of a company called HIDEit Mounts. They had a product that mounted video game consoles and camouflaged them so you didn’t have wires and things sticking out all over your living room.

When this company started out, it was a husband-and-wife team. They didn’t have any experience with product development, product design, or manufacturing, so they did with a lot of startup companies do; they partnered with a manufacturing company and worked with that company to design a prototype and then manufacture these products.

Things were going great. They were selling a lot of products; there were no direct competitors, and the company seemed like it was going to be successful. But then they hit a problem. Another company all of a sudden started selling very similar products, except they were actually a little bit better. And the HIDEit company thought that they might have to go out of business.

They did some research and were able to figure out that it was actually their manufacturer who was behind this competing company. Now thankfully for HIDEit, they went ahead and had their manufacturers sign a nondisclosure agreement early in the relationship. And they were able to use that contract to protect their IP rights and to protect their business. But a lot of startup companies just either ignore, try and use self-help, or don’t give enough thought to potential ways that having a lawyer or using legal solutions can protect against major problems down the road. A lot of companies will use forms off the internet or just won’t use lawyers at all.

The reality is that an extremely modest investment on the front end for a startup company in a competent lawyer who can can create agreements and give advice about ways that this company can protect its proprietary information can go a tremendous way to mitigate against and to deter really serious issues in the future.

So the lesson from this inc.com article for start-up companies is: Don’t think that you’re too early or you don’t have enough money to hire a lawyer. Speak with a lawyer early on in the process. Doing that can solve a lot of really terrible problems in the future.

That’s all for today. I appreciate your time.

 

Federal Circuit Invalidates Financial Analysis Patent, Suggests Trade Secret Protection

Since the Supreme Court decided Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International in 2014, companies have had a difficult time patenting software and business methods. I am not a patent lawyer and this is not a patent blog. But a recent Federal Circuit case shows how companies with this type of IP may want to look to trade-secret laws for protection.

Last week, the Federal Circuit decided SAP America, Inc. v. InvestPic, LLC (a pdf of the opinion can be downloaded here). In this case, a judge in the Northern District of Texas granted judgment on the pleadings in favor of SAP, which filed a declaratory-judgment action seeking to invalidate InvestPic’s patent. The Federal Circuit affirmed.

InvestPic’s patent involved a technique that “utilizes resampled statistical methods for the analysis of financial data[.]” InvestPic claims this is superior to typical financial-market forecast methods that rely on the flawed assumption that “financial data follows a normal or Gaussian distribution.” (This reminds me of The Black Swan’s chapter on “The Bell Curve, That Great Intellectual Fraud.”)

Citing Alice, the Federal Circuit invalidated InvestPic’s patent, finding that it was directed to an abstract idea and did not contain an innovative concept.  This is not an uncommon post-Alice result. But at the end of its opinion, the Federal Circuit made a comment that caught my attention:

There is, in short, nothing “inventive” about any claim details, individually or in combination, that are not themselves in the realm of abstract ideas. . . . [P]atent law does not protect such claims, without more, no matter how groundbreaking the advance. An innovator who makes such an advance lacks patent protection for the advance itself. If any such protection is to be found, the innovator must look outside patent law in search of it, such as in the law of trade secrets, whose core requirement is that the idea be kept secret from the public.

Given the current state of patent law, many companies face a dilemma when trying to monetize potentially abstract ideas: make the disclosures necessary to seek a patent and risk having the patent rejected or invalidated, or adopt a business model that allows for trade-secret protection. This is a complicated analysis that involves many business and legal factors.

As the Federal Circuit noted, trade secrets cannot be publicly disclosed, and they must be reasonably protected. Business models can incorporate these restrictions. For example, it may be possible for a company to license its technology and include confidentiality obligations in the licensing agreement. Companies facing this choice need to involve trade-secret lawyers in strategy discussions and decisions.

Federal Court Addresses Defend Trade Secret Act Immunity

The Defend Trade Secrets Act, 18 U.S.C. 1030, et seq., provides immunity from liability for misappropriation of trade secrets in certain circumstances, namely if the disclosure:

(A) is made–

(i) in confidence to a Federal, State, or local government official, either directly or indirectly, or to an attorney; and

(ii) solely for the purpose of reporting or investigating a suspected violation of law; or

(B)  is made in a complaint or other document filed in a lawsuit or other proceeding, if such filing is made under seal.

Since the DTSA was enacted in May 2016, there have not been many cases analyzing this portion of the statute. The Eastern District of Pennsylvania examined it in a recent opinion, Christian v. Lannett Co., Inc., E.D. Pa. Case No. 16-963 (the opinion can be downloaded below).

Christian is an unusual trade-secret case, as it started when the plaintiff asserted claims for employment discrimination. During discovery, the defendant learned that the plaintiff had retained a company laptop, which led to the plaintiff producing 22,000 pages of documents. Per the defendant, these contained trade secrets.

The defendant then filed a counterclaim under the DTSA, as well as other related claims, based on the plaintiff’s disclosure of trade secrets. But there was apparently no evidence of disclosure to anyone except the plaintiff’s lawyer, who only received the documents to produce them in the litigation.

The court concluded that “Plaintiff’s alleged disclosure was made to Plaintiff’s counsel pursuant to a discovery Order of this Court, within the context of a lawsuit regarding violations of Title VII, the ADA, and the FMLA,” and applied the immunity provision above to bar the DTSA claim.

The court did not specifically cite the immunity provision. And a strict application of that provision would seem to exclude the plaintiff from its protection, since the disclosure was not “solely for the purpose of reporting or investigating a suspected violation of law.” But the court’s decision is well within the spirit of the DTSA, which should not be used to prevent parties in litigation from communicating freely with, and providing discoverable documents to, their counsel.

Christian v Lannett

 

AIPLA Trade Secrets Summit in San Diego, March 1-2

The American Intellectual Property Law Association’s annual Trade Secrets Summit is next week in San Diego. This event, which I have attended for the past three years, is a great opportunity to learn from and network with trade secret practitioners, while racking up CLE credits.

I will be moderating a panel on Corporate Best Practices, and there are a number of great presentations scheduled. You can find out more information here.

Hope to see you there!

Blockchain & Trade Secrets: Miami Conference 1/18-19

Tomorrow and Friday, I will be attending the North American Bitcoin Conference, which will take place two blocks from my office in downtown Miami. A number of startup and more established companies in the blockchain space will be presenting. I’ll be live tweeting the conference from @BlogTradeSecret, with a focus on trade-secrets and related legal issues facing companies in this developing field.

Will Two Lawyers Go to Jail for Asserting Trade Secrets in Bad Faith?

Two South Florida lawyers are facing possible jail time, in part because of allegedly asserting in bad faith that documents contained trade secrets. They supposedly wanted to prevent disclosure of documents that proved their witness testified inaccurately. In a case pending in Miami-Dade County Circuit Court, Green Tree Servicing v. Sibon, the judge decided yesterday to go forward with an arraignment for the two lawyers representing the plaintiff, a large loan servicer, on charges of indirect criminal contempt.

This started as a mortgage foreclosure case. The defendants asserted defenses relating to the plaintiff’s “loan boarding” process, i.e., how the plaintiff uploads information from prior servicers’ records, including borrowers’ payment history.

During a deposition, the plaintiff’s representative testified that the company’s training manuals included protocols for verifying this information, including a flow chart showing the process. But the plaintiff had not previously produced those manuals. Not surprisingly, the defendants’ lawyers demanded their production.

The court entered an order requiring production of the manuals and a further deposition of the plaintiff. Three days before the deposition, the plaintiff filed an emergency motion, asserting that the manuals contained trade secrets and work product. The next day, the court entered an order ruling that the motion was not an emergency and directed the plaintiff to set the motion for a hearing (the usual protocol in Miami-Dade Circuit Court for having a judge rule on a motion).

The deposition went forward without production of the manuals. But the plaintiff never set its emergency motion for hearing. Several months later, the court entered an order requiring production of the manuals by noon that day. At 11:59, the plaintiff produced them.

Apparently, the manuals contradict the witness’s testimony. According to the judge, “the document does not contain any ‘flow chart’ that mentions ‘red flags’ that prevent loans from boarding as Mr. Ogden testified he reviewed. To the contrary, it appears from the document produced that [the plaintiff] boards the prior servicer’s records . . . and makes the loan live on its system before any verification process would even begin.”

And then it got interesting. The judge entered an order to show cause, which can be downloaded here. That order informs both the witness and the plaintiff’s attorneys that “this is now a criminal matter” and directs them to appear to show cause why they should not be held in indirect criminal contempt:

It appears that [the plaintiff] and its counsel willfully and contumaciously ignored this Court’s order by refusing to turn over the training materials. Moreover, it appears [the plaintiff] and its counsel improperly sought to have the records deemed confidential to avoid disclosure of the fact that its witness gave grossly inaccurate testimony[.]

According to an article in the Daily Business Review, yesterday, the new judge handling the case (the prior judge recused himself) “ruled that [the witness] was ‘operating at the will of the lawyers’ and dismissed him from the criminal contempt proceedings.” But she will be going forward with the criminal case against the lawyers, pending an appeal.

If true, this is an egregious abuse of the trade-secrets laws. It’s one thing to be over broad when asserting trade-secret protection. It’s another thing entirely to assert trade secrets when none exist, solely to hide a witness’s inaccurate testimony. It will be interesting to see whether these lawyers are sanctioned, and if so, how harshly.

Bitcoin, Blockchain & Trade Secrets: An Introduction

I’m willing to bet that most readers of this blog have heard of Bitcoin. But I’m not sure how many know about the technology it’s based on, called blockchain. If you haven’t heard of blockchain, now’s the time to learn, since it has the potential to be the most transformative technology since the internet.

I’m going to be writing more about blockchain and the unique trade-secrets issues facing the many companies rushing to develop applications and other technology based on blockchain. But first, I want to give a primer for those who haven’t heard of it.

Blockchain is essentially a database that is distributed among a large number of computers on a network. Each computer with access to the blockchain has an identical copy of the database. Here’s a simple example to explain how it works, from this explanatory post that compares blockchain to a “record book”:

To be clear, this isn’t just one record book stored in a central location that is shared by many. There are thousands of copies of this record book, stored on computers all around the world, both home computers and business servers – hence the term “decentralised”. This record book can be used to record many kinds of things, however I’ll use sending and receiving money as the primary example, as it’s the most common one right now.

When John wants to send money to Sue, a new line item is created detailing that transaction. This line item then gets sent off to hundreds of other computers who have a copy of the record. Those computers confirm that this transaction is authorised, and ultimately they agree (or disagree) that everything about the transaction is legitimate before giving that line item a tick of approval. It has to match up perfectly on every copy of the record.

Each transaction, here John sending money to Sue, is a “block,” which when added to all the prior blocks forms a kind of “chain.” Hence, blockchain.

Since each computer with access to the blockchain has an identical copy of the database, fraudulent transactions are nearly impossible. If any one computer has a blockchain entry that all of the others don’t recognize, that entry is rejected. Entries are only added if all of the computers with access to the database agree.

The first “app” based on blockchain is Bitcoin, a cryptocurrancy. You can watch a short video that explains Bitcoin here. Bitcoin was the first truly digital currency, which allowed the transfer of money without the need for any centralized institution like a bank. Now there are a number of cryptocurrancies with names like Ether and litecoin.

But blockchain’s potential goes far beyond currencies. It can be used to streamline, simplify, and secure a wide variety of transactions, such as supply-chain management, digitial voting, collecting taxes, and recording real estate transfers and ownership. Essentially, any transaction involving value could be conducted—and improved—on the blockchain. Some think that the entire worldwide financial system will eventually move to blockchain — and I agree. Additionally, developers are using a blockchain platform called Etherium (which also underpins the Ether cryptocurrancy) to create “smart contracts” — essentially programming code that is capable of executing or enforcing contractual terms. This is a powerful, but complicated, concept that I will discuss in more detail in a future post.

Companies large and small are racing to develop new “apps” based on blockchain technologies.  This entire industry is essentially in the research-and-development phase, which means that trade-secrets issues abound. These companies can benefit from tech-savvy lawyers who understand how to protect this rapidly developing information.

This post is a very basic introduction to blockchain. I’m fascinated by the technology and see virtually limitless potential. If you want to learn more, I’d recommend The Internet of Money, an excellent book by Andreas M. Antonopoulos. And stay tuned — I intend to explore the intersection of blockchain and trade secrets here at Protecting Trade Secrets.

One Simple Step in Outlook to Protect Your Trade Secrets

If you and your employees use Outlook, you can take one simple step now to dramatically reduce the risk of inadvertent sharing of confidential information: Disable email-address auto fill.

Everyone loves this feature. You type the first few letters of someone’s name, and Outlook fills in an email address. But the increased efficiency comes at a cost, as everyone occasionally sends an email to the wrong person whose name is similar to the intended recipient.

If that email contains confidential info, you’ve just compromised it. Hopefully, you sent it to someone friendly who will comply with your embarrassed request to delete the email. Even if there’s no confidential information, the recipients may question your ability to exercise discretion when necessary. (Also, imagine later trying to prosecute a trade-secrets action and having to produce in discovery an email sending the info at issue to some random guy.)

So I strongly recommend that you disable this feature. And have your IT department disable it for all employees. The relatively minor loss of efficiency is outweighed by the reduced risk of unwanted disclosure. And there’s an added benefit: not having to send sheepish apology emails to the mistaken recipients (and sometimes to the other intended recipients who now have an interloper privy to the discussion).

Here’s how you disable this feature:

File –> Options –> Mail –> Send Messages –> Deselect the radio button for “Use Auto-Complete List to suggest names when typing in the To, CC, and Bcc lines”

ABA Ethics Opinion: Trade-Secrets Lawyers Need to Encrypt Emails

By definition, lawyers working on trade-secrets issues, whether in litigation or otherwise, have access to their clients’ most confidential information. And, of course, these lawyers routinely communicate with clients via email, including about the trade secrets. Sometimes, even the trade secrets themselves are exchanged via email.

This raises ethical issues. Recently, the ABA Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility issued a formal opinion addressing lawyers’ ethical obligations when transmitting confidential client information. The opinion can be downloaded here.

All lawyers who deal with trade-secrets issues should read the opinion. But here are some highlights:

The opinion recognizes that law firms are hacking targets because:

(1) they obtain, store and use highly sensitive information about their clients while at times utilizing safeguards to shield that information that may be inferior to those deployed by the client, and (2) the information in their possession is more likely to be of interest to a hacker and likely less voluminous than that held by the client.

It then discusses applicable ethical rules, concluding that “lawyers must exercise reasonable efforts when using technology in communicating about client matters.” So what are reasonable efforts?

What constitutes reasonable efforts is not susceptible to a hard and fast rule, but rather is contingent upon a set of factors. In turn, those factors depend on the multitude of possible types of information being communicated (ranging along a spectrum from highly sensitive information to insignificant), the methods of  electronic communications employed, and the types of available security measures for each method.

The opinion specifically mentions lawyers who deal with trade secrets, since those matters “may present a higher risk of data theft.” The fact-based analysis is often relatively simple in trade secrets cases: if you are transmitting your client’s trade secrets or related information, you may need to use “particularly strong protective measures”:

A fact-based analysis means that particularly strong protective measures, like encryption, are warranted in some circumstances. Model Rule 1.4 may require a lawyer to discuss security safeguards with clients. Under certain circumstances, the lawyer may need to obtain informed consent from the client regarding whether to the use enhanced security measures, the costs involved, and the impact of those costs on the expense of the representation where nonstandard and not easily available or affordable security methods may be required or requested by the client. Reasonable efforts, as it pertains to certain highly sensitive information, might require avoiding the use of electronic methods or any technology to communicate with the client altogether, just as it warranted avoiding the use of the telephone, fax and mail in Formal Opinion 99-413.

There is a simple takeaway for all trade-secrets lawyers: think very carefully about how you are transmitting confidential client info. This requires an open dialogue with the client. You need to figure out how you will be protecting this data while in transit (and at rest, but that’s a separate issue). At my firm, we have the capacity to encrypt individual emails on-demand, which can allow for secure transmission of sensitive data.

But this sensitive data isn’t only shared with clients. Often, it will need to be produced in litigation. Lawyers spend a lot of time negotiating protective/confidentiality orders with attorney’s eyes only (AEO) protections. But don’t forget to securely transmit AEO documents to the other side. For example, my firm uses a secure/encrypted document sharing platform.

Trade-secrets cases often move fast. But this ABA opinion shows that regardless of how intense the litigation becomes, lawyers must be cognizant of their obligations to protect clients’ confidential information.

Damages for Misappropriation of Trade Secrets Found Non-Dischargeable In Bankruptcy

Guest post by Solomon B. Genet

As Eric’s law partner, from time to time I “guest post” on trade secret issues in the insolvency / bankruptcy context.  One important issue involves the dischargeability of pre-bankruptcy misappropriation claims. The March 31, 2017 In re Mandel decision out of the Eastern District of Texas addresses this issue.  There, claimants filed proofs of claim in Mandel’s bankruptcy case alleging that the debtor violated the Texas Civil Theft Liability Act (“TCTLA”) by misappropriating trade secrets. The debtor objected to these claims. On September 30, 2011, the bankruptcy court tried the matter and found that the debtor violated the TCTLA and awarded the claimants damages and attorney’s fees. Years later, the issue before the bankruptcy court was whether these claims (arising from conduct prior to the bankruptcy filing) could be discharged in the bankruptcy case.

The claimants asserted that the damages for violation of the TCTLA were non-dischargeable on a variety of bases, and the bankruptcy court ruled in favor of the claimants on some theories and against the claimant on others.  To narrow the issues for purposes of this post, the bankruptcy court determined that its previous decision finding (as a matter of fact and law) that the debtor misappropriated trade secrets was sufficient to also prove that the debtor committed: (1) fraud; (2) larceny (fraudulent and wrongful taking of the property of another with intent to convert such property to the taker’s use without the consent of the owner); and (3) embezzlement (fraudulent appropriation of property by a person to whom such property has been entrusted, or into whose hands it has lawfully come).  Each of these bases gave rise to the misappropriation of trade secret claims being non-dischargeable.  Therefore, the bankruptcy court did not require re-litigation of the issues and found in favor of the claimants.

Practice Pointer:    When litigating a claim for misappropriation of trade secrets, make sure your strategy includes collection of the debt arising from that claim.  If there is a possibility that the wrongdoer may file for bankruptcy, consider the elements of a claim for non-dischargeablity when presenting and proving your case.

The case is In re Mandel, No. 12-4128, 2017 WL 1207503 (E.D. Tx. March 31, 2017).

 

 

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