Sometimes companies forget about even the most obvious protections for their trade secrets. For example, “don’t tweet out a picture of your secret business strategies.” The Orlando Magic recently did just that.

Earlier this month, a player’s agent tweeted a picture of the player signing a new contract with the Magic. But the picture also showed a dry-erase board listing the Magic’s off-season free-agent targets and trade possibilities. Now there are reports that the Magic’s general manager, who has since been fired, took the picture.

It goes without saying that the Magic don’t want the rest of the league knowing about their off-season personnel plans, which are arguably trade secrets if appropriately protected. But for some reason, they left those plans on a dry-erase board and then let an agent—who could potentially benefit from knowing that information—into the room. And then they allowed the contents of the board to be shared with the rest of the world. Not particularly savvy.

The lesson here is simple, and seemingly obvious: trade secrets need to be secret. They shouldn’t be left up on a dry-erase board. Or in papers on someone’s desk. This episode shows that even intelligent people can have a lapse of judgment. If you implement and enforce a trade-secrets policy that only allows storage of trade secrets in secure media, and limits disclosure of trade secrets to those who need them to do their jobs, you can minimize the “human error” element that led to this embarrassing gaffe.

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