Periscope is an app that allows users to broadcast live video using their smart phone. This technology has the power to transform the delivery of media and information. Essentially, every person can now effortlessly create live video content, whether it’s sharing a family event with those who can’t attend or witnessing a newsworthy event.

I keep hearing more and more about Periscope. For example, I’ve seen media members use it to share press conferences or behind-the-scenes info. At first blush, this may seem irrelevant to your company’s trade secrets. But that may not be the case.

Right now, through Periscope and similar apps, every one of your employees can instantaneously broadcast live video to the world. It’s much easier to share exactly what’s going on, in real time, at your company.

This raises multiple levels of concern. To start, employees may inadvertently transmit proprietary information. For example, an employee could be sharing a broadcast from work intended for his friends and family, while other employees discuss proprietary information within earshot. Even though there was no intent, this information was still shared outside the company.

Even worse, Periscope is a powerful tool in the hands of someone with malicious intent. There has long been a risk that malicious actors can easily capture video. But now, that video can be shared live. For example, an employee could surreptitiously broadcast a company meeting. Or live video of a proprietary process or system.

Periscope is another example of how rapidly evolving technology is constantly creating new risks to your trade secrets. Your trade-secrets policy needs periodic review to make sure it addresses new technology. Depending on the nature of your business, it may make sense to ban live broadcasts completely. Most importantly, you should discuss these issues with an attorney who can help you decide what protections are appropriate for your business.

 

 

1 Comment

  1. If you are a theme park executive, for example, you no doubt live in mortal fear that paint formulations will leak off campus and into a competitor’s formulary. Those formulas can be stolen using infinite varieties of subterfuge, including Periscope. The use of smart phones for surreptitious spying has already given elitists like Mitt Romney some comeuppance. As I channel George Orwell, I see that smart phones will increasingly manifest as a weapon of class warfare and that the only corporate interests who need be concerned are those engaged in unfair trade.

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